Optional Rules

Determine Ability Scores

There are a variety of ways of generating the six ability scores (strength, dexterity, constitution, intelligence, wisdom, and charisma) that help define what your character can do in the game.


Here are some methods we have used in our games.


Modified 4d6


In this method, you randomly generate an array of six scores. Roll 4d6 and sum the score of the highest three dice to create an attribute score. Do this six times so you have generated your array of scores. You can then allocate those scores as you wish across the six attributes.
In addition, with this method, you are allowed three re-rolls. You can spend a re-roll on any die of your choice, but once you have summed the score of the highest three dice and set an attribute score, you can’t re-roll those dice. In other words, the decision to re-roll a die must be made before moving on to the next roll.


6+2d6


In this method, you randomly generate your array of scores, but there is an established minimum as each attribute has a base score of 6.
 Roll 2d6 and sum the score. Add 6 to this score to create an attribute score. Do this six times so you have generated your array of score. You can then allocate those scores as you wish across the six attributes.
In addition, with this method, you are allowed two re-rolls. You can spend a re-roll on any die of your choice, but once you have summed the score of the highest three dice and set an attribute score, you can’t re-roll those dice. In other words, the decision to re-roll a die must be made before moving on to the next roll.

Group Generated Array


This method also uses a standard array of six attribute scores that are used by all the players. In this method, however, the players create an array as a group.
Each player creates an array of six attribute scores. To do so, the player rolls 3d6 and sums the score six times.
Once every player has generated an array of six attribute scores, the players vote on which array will be used by everyone. Each player can assign the scores in the chosen array as they wish.
This method tends to work better when you have at least four players. If there are less players, you can have each player generate more than one array.


Rules for Magic

Breaking Concentration

Casting spells can be dangerous in the world of Cloak & Coin.

There is a reason that Soul Wardens exist.
This optional rule adds consequences to casting spells. Whenever you must make a Constitution saving throw to maintain concentration on a spell, if you roll a 1 on the d20, you take psychic damage equal to the level at which the spell was cast. In addition, if your hit points are reduced to 0 because of this effect, every creature in a 15 ft .radius also takes psychic damage equal to the level at which the spell was cast.

Components

Many spells require components. Some are rather mundane and cheap, while others are esoteric or costly. Arcane spell casters often carry a component pouch. 


Material components get used up in spells, can expire and lose their efficacy, or simply get lost or ruined on occasion. In other words, the component pouch is not an infinite source of materials.


Instead, a spell caster must spend 10 gp a month refilling the component pouch with materials. This is in addition to any cost involved with materials that have a specific cost as indicated in the spell’s description.